Blog Post #4: Inception


Due Monday, February 20th
Did the top fall or didn't it?  Many theories have abounded about that very issue, which in and of itself is a testament to the impact of Christopher Nolan's Inception.  

There are two parts to this post:

Part One: come up with your own theory on the top, and thereby Cobb's, ultimate fate based on the elements of plot and point of view we covered in class.


Part Two: compare and contrast your theory with the other online theory and post your findings, deciding which one is the best answer.

Kofi Outlaw over at Screenrant has some interesting ideas *see the pasted article below.
Click here to find some plausible theories.
Click here for Inception as a metaphor for film making.
Click here for the Inception is actually on Cobb theory.
Here is an interesting take on the names.  Here is another.
You may also search other theories online.

In the end, ponder the words of the director himself, Christopher Nolan:

“There can’t be anything in the film that tells you one way or another because then the ambiguity at the end of the film would just be a mistake … It would represent a failure of the film to communicate something. But it’s not a mistake. I put that cut there at the end, imposing an ambiguity from outside the film. That always felt the right ending to me — it always felt like the appropriate ‘kick’ to me….The real point of the scene — and this is what I tell people — is that Cobb isn’t looking at the top. He’s looking at his kids. He’s left it behind. That’s the emotional significance of the thing.”

Remember to post your comment using proper MLA format -
1. Start with the header:
  • Your Name
  • Teacher's Name
  • Class 
  • Date (day, month, year with no commas)
For example:
Peter Parker
Mr. Scheuer
Modern Fiction - Hour 6 (your choices: 6 or 8)
20 February 2017

2. Then write your response.  Remember others may see this, so you need to use proper grammar, punctuation...).

3. At the bottom of this post, click on the comments link and post it using the anonymous setting.


*The post below comes from the link at screenrant.com:

The Rules

So, the first thing to talk about are the rules of the dream world Nolan created for the film. With all the action that happened onscreen, it was easy to forget some of the finer details – but once the lights came up, and people had time to think, I know the question of who was dreaming which dreams certainly came up (among others questions as well).
Remember the basic premise: Cobb (the extractor) and his team are con artists, and like any con artists their job is to construct a false reality and manipulate it in order to confuse and/or fool a mark (in this case industrialist Robert Fischer, played by Cillian Murphy). Nolan takes the classic concept of a con man a step further by making Cobb and his team dream thieves, but in the end, the basic concept is still your classic con/heist movie.
Dream Levels and Dream Time
Nolan throws a lot of fancy math at you but it’s all really inconsequential. All you need to really know are the basic concepts:
The dream within a dream process puts you into a deeper state of dreaming. The deeper you go, the further removed your mind is from reality. We all know what that’s like: the deeper you sleep, the harder it is to be woken up and the more vivid and real-feeling a dream becomes. If you’re in a deep enough sleep, not even the usual physical ques to wake up effect you, such as the sensation of falling (“the kick”) or even, say, having to go to the bathroom.
By the time you reach the Limbo state it can be so difficult to wake, and the dream can feel so vividly real, that the mind stops trying to wake at all – the mind accepts the dream as its reality, like slipping into a coma.
When you wake up in Limbo you don’t remember that there is such a thing as a “real world” – as in any dream, you wake up in the middle of  a scene and simply accept it for what it is. Breaking yourself out of this cycle is extremely difficult, which is why Cobb and his wife Mal were trapped in Limbo for what seemed like decades.
Time is the other factor. The deeper you go into a dream state, the faster your mind is able to imagine and perceive things within that dream state. We’re told the increase is exponential, so going deeper into dreams turns minutes into hours, into days, into years. This is why Cobb and his team are able to pull off the Fischer job while the van is still falling through the air, before the soldiers break into the snow fortress, before Arthur rigs the elevator, and all within the span of a flight from Sydney Australia to LA.
In Limbo, the mind works so fast that actual minutes can be interpreted as years gone by. When Saito “dies” from the gunshot wound he received on level 1 of the dream, his mind falls into Limbo, and Saito remains there for the minutes it takes Cobb and Ariadne (Ellen Page) to follow him into Limbo – those minutes in one dream state feel like decades to Saito in his Limbo state.  By the time Cobb deals with expelling Mal’s “shadow” from his subconscious, Saito has begun to perceive himself as an old man.
Mal’s shadow stabs Cobb during the film’s climax, which throws Cobb back out into Limbo and onto the shores of Saito’s limbo house. When Cobb has to “wake” again in Limbo, his mind is muddled just like old man Saito’s brain. Through Saito’s memory of Cobb’s totem and some shared dialogue that included key trigger phrases – “Leap of faith,” “Old man full of regret, waiting to die alone,” etc. – Cobb and Saito are able to remember the meaningful conversations they had and that there is a reality they existed in before Limbo, where both of them had deep desires still waiting to be fulfilled (Cobb and his kids, Saito and his business). Once they remember that limbo is limbo,  they are able to wake themselves up (likely with a gunshot to the head).

The Players

The Extractor – The extractor is a master con man, a person who knows how to manipulate a dreaming mark into revealing their deepest mental secrets. At heart, an extractor is a classic con man – he creates a false set of circumstances that manipulate the mark into revealing his secrets. Cobb (Leo DiCaprio) uses the same type of con man repertoire as George Clooney in Oceans 11 – only Cobb knows how to literally do his work on a subconscious level. Fancy premise aside though, the extractor (as I said) is basically your classic con man.
The Architect – The architect is the designer of the dream constructs into which an extractor brings a “mark.” Think of an architect as a video game designer, except in this case they create the “levels” within a dream, complete with all the aesthetic and tactile details. The mark (also known as “the subject”) is brought into that dream construct and fills it with details from their own subconscious and memories, which convince the mark that the dream the architect built is real – or at the very least, is the mark’s own dream.
The architect can manipulate real world architecture and physics in order to create paradoxes like an endless staircase, which makes the dream world function as a sort of maze. The dream is constructed as a maze so that A) The mark doesn’t reach the edge of the maze, realizing that they are in an imaginary place. B) So the mark runs the maze, leading the extractor toward “the cheese” – i.e.,  mental secrets the mark is protecting.
The Dreamer – The architect and the dreamer are not always the same person. The architect designs the dream world/maze and can then teach that maze to a separate dreamer. The dreamer is the person whose mind actually houses the dream and it is the dreamer’s mind that the subject/mark is ultimately brought into in order to to be conned by the extractor. The dreamer allows the mark to fill their mind with the mark’s subconscious, and unless the dreamer maintains the stability of the dream, the mark’s subconscious will realize it’s been invaded by foreign mind(s) and will try to locate and eliminate the dreamer to free itself.
When you start getting into the whole dream within a dream aspect of the movie, identifying the dreamer can be tricky – this is especially true when Cobb and his team start running their con on Fischer using three separate levels of dreaming. Once the tri-level dream sequence starts, one good way to keep track of the dreamers is by noticing which team member stays awake and doesn’t follow the team down to the next level of dreaming – a dreamer can’t enter a lower dream state, otherwise their level of the dream would end.
Here’s a rundown of who is actually dreaming each level of the Fischer con:
  1. The rainy city – Yusuf the chemist (Dileep Rao) is dreaming this level. Yusuf is drinking a lot of champagne in the “real world” on the plane, so when he goes to sleep he has to pee (hence the rainfall). Since Yusuf is the dreamer of level 1, he has to stay in that level of the dream, hence why he has to drive the van.
  2. The hotel – Arthur (Joseph Gordon Levitt) dreams the hotel, which is why he has to stay awake when the rest of the team goes down to the snow level. When the van Yusuf is driving goes off the bridge and is flying through the air, Aurthur’s “body” is suspended in air, which is why gravity in the hotel level of the dream goes haywire – as the dreamer’s body is shifted and moved, it effects the physics of the dream he’s dreaming, since the mind (and inner-ear) is registering the change in gravity.
  3. The snow fortress – Eames the “forger” (Tom hardy) is dreaming this level of the dream. A question has been raised about why the gravity in the snow world doesn’t go haywire when Eames’ body starts floating in the zero-gravity hotel. Well, you could say that Eames’ body isn’t being shook up or shifted in any way his mind (or inner-ear) would actively register or that being so deep in a dream state cushioned Eames from the effect of gravity. Or, you could say that it’s a glaring plot hole. Truthfully, it’s questionable.
  4. Limbo – Limbo is actually unconstructed  dream space – a place of raw (and random) subconscious impulse. Ariadne drops a line early on about the fact that the extractor team can bring elements of their own subconscious into the dream levels if they’re not careful, and since Cobb has spent time in Limbo and has a raging subconscious, the Limbo space they enter includes his memory of the city he and Mal built for themselves.
If you’re more of a visual person, Cinema Blend has put together a handy graphic detailing the different levels featured in Inception:
The Mark – The mark (Cillain Murphy) is the person who the extractor and his team are trying to con. The mark is brought into the mind of the dreamer, and since the mark is unaware that he/she is dreaming, they perceive the dreamer’s world as real while simultaneously making it feel real to themselves by filling it with details and secrets from their own subconscious. The extractor uses those details and various mental prompts  to steer the mark through the dream world maze, towards the mental secrets the extractor wants to steal.
As stated, the mark thinks he is still awake, perceives the dream world as real and reinforces that notion by “projecting” his conscious view of the world onto the dream – this is why projection people populate the dream cities, etc. Because of the extractor’s manipulations, the mark goes along with the faux reality of dream, ultimately reaching the point where they either realize it’s a dream, or open their mind and reveal their secrets.
Projections – Dreams feel real to us when we’re dreaming and part of the reason for that is our mind’s ability to construct  a faux real-world setting for us to interact with in dreams. Often, that dream is something like a city or any populated area which has other people walking around it.  in Inception, those people that the unknowing mark populates the dream world with are known as “projections.”
As is explained in the film, projections are not part of the mark’s mind – they are manifestations of the mark’s vision of reality. If a mark has been trained to defend themselves against extractors, they have a part of their subconscious which is always on guard against mind-crime in the form of militarized security which attack mind invaders. In Cobb’s case, Mal (“the shade”) is a projection based on his need to remember his dead wife. Mal wanted Cobb back in limbo – his own subconscious trying to pull him back to a place where he could “be with her.”
The Forger – As in “forgery,” Eames (Tom Hardy) is a master of imitating people’s handwriting, mannerisms – and in the dream world, even their very appearance.  This is key to Cobb’s plan: on dream level 1 (the rainy city) Eames impersonates Peter Browning (Tom Berenger), Robert Fischer’s closest advisor.
Using Browning’s image, Eames subtly suggests things to Fischer that fools Fischer into creating his own subconscious version of Browning (seen in dream level 2, the hotel). The version of Browning Fischer conjures in his subconscious motivates him to run deeper into Cobb’s maze (dream level 3, the snow fortress) in order to find “the cheese” – i.e., the inception of the idea Saito wanted Cobb to plant. Basically, the Forger fools Fischer into using his own subconscious projections against himself.
Mal (and her shadow) – Mal is the character who acts as a vessel for all the more complex notions and questions about reality the film raises. Mal not only thought but felt that the world she and Cobb had built in limbo was real – it fed her emotionally and made her happy. When Cobb planted the idea that “Your world is not real” in her mind, he only meant for it to wake her from limbo. Instead, what he actually did by allowing that idea to take root in her mind was to destroy that sense of fulfillment and connection she once had – and once it was destroyed, it couldn’t be repaired.
Even with her husband and children all back together, Mal couldn’t access that emotional reality that comes with the bond of love and connection to our love ones. Because of inception, Mal couldn’t value love or connection the same way because a fake reality only offered fake connections and emotions – only she and Cobb and their love was real to her anymore. She needed to keep trying to reach some higher state where the nagging doubt would be cured and she could be happy again. And so, thinking Cobb lost in a faux reality, she arranged the hotel suicide and murder implication in order to force Cobb to follow her. The idea Cobb implanted in her led her to her death (seemingly), and the guilt of that act led Cobb to create a shadow of her in his subconscious.
At the climax of the film, Mal throws deep questions at Cobb (and the audience) asking if having faceless corporations chase somebody around isn’t yet another dream state. She questions the very nature of reality for all of us and certainly whether or not the faux reality of film isn’t its own sort of dream state – a place where fantastic things occur – an imagined place we as movie goers share and perceive differently and fill with our own subconscious views and interpretations. Pretty deep meta-thinking stuff.
Well, as an answer Mr. Nolan, I can say: only when a movie like Inception comes around to light that sort of spark in our minds. Seeing Clash of the Titans was nearly a thought-provoking, fun or worthwhile. 

The Ending

There are a ton of theories being tossed around the Internet about the ending of Inception, the two biggest debates being whether Cobb was still in a dream or did he in fact return to his children in the “real world.”
The ending of Inception is meant to leave you thinking and questioning the nature of reality. The important question is not “Is Cobb still dreaming?” – What is important is the fact that the character of Cobb goes from being a guy who is obsessed with “knowing what’s real” to ultimately being a person who stops questioning and accepts what makes him truly happy as what’s real.
But people want more concrete answers than that, so here you go:
After two viewings I can tell you that from the moment that Cobb and Saito (seem to) wake up from limbo, Nolan very purposefully shifts the film into an ambiguous state that leaves it somewhat open to the viewer’s perception and interpretation of that perception – two big themes of the movie, coincidentally enough.
From the moment Cobb and Saito wake, there is no more dialogue between the characters and few shots or images that would concretely explain or prove one interpretation. Is Cobb still dreaming and his team and family (and maybe Saito) are all projections? Or is it the job completed, everyone is back in reality and everything is happily ever after? There are a few pieces of “evidence” that we can certainly address:
  • Was Saito truly powerful enough to make one phone call and end Cobb’s problems or was that just Cobb in limbo projecting his subconscious wish to go home? You can argue logistics all you want, but if it’s said that Saito is a powerful and wealthy man (he bought a whole airline on a whim), then there’s reason enough to infer that he could bend the legal system for Cobb. Rich powerful people bend laws all the time.
  • Is there something up with that immigration agent or is he just an immigration agent?After two viewings, the conclusion should be that the immigration guy is just a guy. If he’s staring at Cobb, it’s because his job is to look people over and scrutinize them. Would you want immigration letting people through without face-to-face scrutiny?
  • Did Cobb’s father (Michael Caine) arrange to meet him at the airport or is he there because he’s Cobb’s projection? At this point we’re reading way too much into things. There is a phone on the plane, so Cobb could’ve easily arranged for pickup. This was also an intricate plan they were hatching, so arranging for airport pickup would probably be on the to-do list.
  • In early dream scenes Cobb is wearing a wedding band that doesn’t appear in the “real world” scenes or the end scenes in the airport – does that mean the ending is “reality?” Details like that are certainly strong evidence that there is a real world and that Cobb does live in it at times – such as when he isn’t wearing a wedding band.
  • Does the fact that Cobb uses Mal’s totem mean it doesn’t work as a totem and therefore he never knows if he’s in reality or not? Again, we’re reading a little too deep into things. The only people who know the weight and feel of that totem are Mal and Cobb, and since Mal is dead, Cobb is the only one left who knows the totem’s tactile details. So yes, he could certainly use it as a measure of reality, the totem was not “ruined” by him using it.
  • At the end, Cobb’s kids seem to be the same age and are seemingly wearing the same clothes as they were in his memory of them – is it “proof” he’s still dreaming?As carefully documented by our own Vic Holtreman, at the end of the film Cobb’s kids are wearing similar outfits to the ones he remembers, but their shoes are different. As for their ages: if you check IMDB, there are actually two set of actors credited with playing Cobb’s kids. The daughter, Phillipa, is credited as being both 3 and 5 years old, while the son, James, is credited as being both 20 months and 3 years old. This suggests that while it might be subtle, there is a difference between the kids in Cobb’s memories and the kids Cobb comes home to. That would suggest the homecoming is in fact “reality.” But feel free to debate that.
  • Will the spinning top keep spinning or was it about to fall over just before Nolan cut to black? Sorry, we will never know for sure, although it does start to wobble and it is never shown doing that in the dream world. Each of us will take away a guess – kind of the point of that final shot.
At the beginning of the film, after the first job Cobb’s team tries to pull on Saito, we see Cobb sitting in his hotel room alone, spinning the top and watching it intently, gun in hand. This is a guy who is ready to blow his brains out if the top keeps spinning, in order to “wake himself up.” That’s how obsessed and paranoid he’s become.
Throughout the film, Cobb continues to obsess about spinning the top and verifying reality – however, at the end of movie, he spins the top and walks away from it before he can verify if it stops spinning or not. His kids come running in and Cobb couldn’t care less about about the top or “true reality” or extraction/inception anymore. He just wants to be with his children, in whatever place he can be with them. That emotional connection and desire is “reality” enough for him.
In the end, Cobb walking away from the top is a statement in itself that also completes the arc of his character. In a way, the movie is its own maze designed to plant a simple little idea in the viewer’s mind: “reality” is a relative concept.

Comments

  1. Antonio Rose
    Modern Fiction
    Mr. Scheur
    2/18/17


    My theory is that is that Cobb's is back in the real world not his own dream why because I believe the totem actually toppled over and was re spun at the end.

    From the theories just like mine some of them are basing their theories off the totem at the end of the movie. A difference in their theories from mine is that some think Cobb's is in his own dream and is locked up somewhere and wishes he could see his wife and kids other one suggests that the whole movie Inception is just a big metaphor to tell people to stop watching so many fictional movies and shows because you'll start doubting reality. However in the end these are just theories and we'll never really know.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Christine Wilcox
    Mr. Scheuer
    Modern Fiction – Hour 6
    19 February 2017
    My theory is that at the top fell in the end. When we see the top spinning in a dream, it never wobbles in the slightest way; however, at the end of the film, we see it begin to wobble unsteadily. I think that Cobb is in reality. My theory is similar to the Screenrant theory that mentioned how the top also never wobbled in the dream world. The other theory also pondered whether or not Saito would have the ability to make one call and have Cobb free of charges. I never really thought that part through that much. My theory is similar to the other theory, but the Screenrant theory is more complete, so I think it is better.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Chris Means
    Mr.Scheuer
    mod fic 6
    2/20/17

    Part one: My theory on the ending is that the top kept spinning and he was still in limbo. My reasoning for this is that when he woke up everything seemed perfect a little to perfect and also his father was waiting for him which I found a little suspect. Another reason for my theory is that when he woke up his kids were in the same position that he'd always see them in his dreams which was very suspect. I'd like to think that this movie had a happy ending but let's be real Cobb ended up in limbo which is were he probably wanted to be anyways.

    Part two: That the inception is really on cobbs and he is actually in limbo himself. This theory works with my theory stating that cobbs is still in limbo and doesn't necessarily remember that he is. I think his wife is trying to wake him up and get him to reality.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Zavier Westmoreland
    Mr. Scheuer
    Modern Fiction - Hour 6
    20 February 2017


    Part 1: I believe that Cobb woke up and the top dropped. At the end, Saito and Cobb remember they are in limbo and eventually, Saito picks up the gun on the table and scenes change. In limbo, the time takes longer than it would in the all the other stages. So the kick may have woke them up in time to bring them back to reality. The car hitting the bottom of the lake may have been another kick for Saito and Cobb to wake up, the second hit in the elevator car would be the the second kick in that level, and the the fortress crushing the crew would be the last kick to wake them up to reality. Overall, There had to be a way for Cobb and Saito to wake up and snap back to reality.

    Part 2: "Will the spinning top keep spinning or was it about to fall over just before Nolan cut to black? Sorry, we will never know for sure, although it does start to wobble and it is never shown doing that in the dream world. Each of us will take away a guess – kind of the point of that final shot." I'm confident the top fell over, simply because the top doesn't wobble in the dream world. Whenever they show the top in the dream world, it stays the same the whole time. Even when Saito and Cobb at the end were talking, the top does not move around much. It stays in relatively the same place and moves at the same speed, it doesn't slow or move about on the table.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Joseph Bradford
    Mr.schuer
    Hour 6
    Feb/20/17
    I believe the top had fallen because of the fact it was wiggling as it was slowing up and about to fall and I believe that he was in real life because we got to see the kids faces and in the dream we couldn't

    ReplyDelete
  6. Akeia Ohkhuare
    Mr.Scheuer
    Modern Fiction - Hour 6
    20 February 2017

    My theory about the ending is that it ends with Cobb back in reality with his kids and the top falls at the end. The theory I read was that the inception was put on Cobb and I honestly think that would not be the case it just makes no sense because what idea would she plant in his mind? What would be the point of putting the inception on Cobb?

    ReplyDelete
  7. Benjamin Ewert
    Mr. Scheuer
    Modern Fiction - Hour 6
    20 February 2017

    1. My theory is not limited to the top spinning at the end, but also contains when the team is in the plane still. Cobb wakes up first and then Saito. This and the fact that both of them are young again shows that Cobb woke up in reality, otherwise Saito would be old when he woke up. The top scene at the end is cut short, but I believe that when Cobb first spun it, it would have fallen over because it did not straighten out until we saw it right before black out. Could someone else in the house have spun it between the camera zooming in on Cobb and black out? It is very possible because we do not know who is all in the house at the time. Also, Cobb said that Mal and him did not create their house in Limbo because they wanted all their memories in one place, hence the hotel. How could all those people be projections when originally we did not see any projections in Limbo, just Mal, Cobb, and the kids they had in Limbo.

    2. In contrast to the seventh theory about the ending, my theory states that there may have been another person in the house who spun it before the top was shown again before black out. I my theory did not include any of the other theories ideas, so it is kind of hard to compare them to mine.

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  8. Patty Noggle
    Mr. Scheuer
    Modern Fiction Hour 6
    20 February 2017

    If you are talking about the top in general than I would have to say I believe it does clearly distinguish between a dream and reality. If you are talking about the top at the end; however, I would like to hope that it fell down meaning that Cobb was in the real world.

    I hope that the top fell down because I would like to believe that Cobb really , FINALLY, got to see his kids. I was rooting for him throughout the entire movie. I do have to say I doubted that he would actually end up seeing his kids again, which is why the ending was so hard for me. Not knowing is such a pet peeve for me, as for a lot of others as well. The theory I am choosing to compare and contrast is the one where the inception is actually on Cobb. If this were actually the truth I would be very upset because it would mean that Cobb never really got to see his kids in reality. The thought of it being a copping mechanism to get over his wife's death is somewhat comforting though because it means that someone was trying to help him. I do not like the idea that he is in an insane asylum though because that is just sad. I really don't think it is an inception on Cobb though because of the spinning top. The top is the dreamers only concrete (or so we think) way of distinguishing a dream from reality. We see it fall multiple times in the movie, which leads me to believe he is awake in the real world when that happens. I wish I knew the answer to inception, but of course I will never know, so all I can do is hope for the best. The best being that Cobb was able to get back to his kids...in REALITY.

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  9. Andria Ostovich
    Mr. Scheuer
    Modern Fiction 6th Hour
    Feb. 20 2017

    I like to believe that the top did fall. I say that not only because it wiggled at the end of the scene but because it just seems like the most logical theory. They all seemingly woke up from all of the dreams, Cobb overcame his subconscious with Maul and he even got to see his kids. In all of the dreams when he would see his kids he would never be able to see their faces and they never turned around. However at the end of the movie he did see them and they seemed to be a bit older. It all leads up to the conclusion that he is now in reality. Or at least he has decided that whatever he is in is his reality. Although I still think that the top did fall and he is in reality.

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  10. Darien Games
    Mr. Scheuer
    Modern Fiction - Hour 6
    20 February 2016

    I think that Cobb is indeed dreaming. The fact that the ring is never shown is very good attention to detail by Nolan. I feel as if he really was with his kids again why would they still be at the same house from earlier. If a child's mom was killed and the dad ran away I feel as if the kids would be moved to a different place. Also I believe that the dad was overseas so why would he be there to pick him up at the airport. They also didn't have anyone else at the the house so who was taking care of the kids if the dad was on the run and the granddad was overseas. That just really doesn't make sense.

    The best theory that I've read is that it is all a dream because he could make the top fall if he wanted it to be reality in a dream and he could not wear the dream in a dream because he wants it to be reality. This makes sense to me because it shows that if he is dreaming he choose whatever he wants to believe. The entire movie he could be dreaming. Also when Adriane was in limbo she woke up on the next level of the dream while Cobb went straight back to real life. Why would Cobb surpass all the other levels if someone else didn't?

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  11. Dayshon,Smith
    Modern Fiction
    February 20,2017

    I believe it kept spinning because in the first few minutes in the movie it kinda toppled but stood up and no one knows if it fell it just looked as if it would topple over but it didn't because he was dreaming and trapped in limbo.

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  12. Dejahnay Hopson
    February 20 2017
    Modern Fict.

    I believe the top fell it was starting to lose momentum when he spun it so it was going to fall eventually cobbs was in reality not a dream the top had to have fallen towards the end

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  13. Ellie Goodman
    Mr. Scheur
    Modern Fiction- hour 6
    20 February 2017

    Throughout the movie Inception... It was actually hard for me to understand because I didn't really get most of it... I eventually I figured out that having the wristband on meant you were dreaming... And without the wristband... You were in reality. At the end of the movie... I think the top was gonna fall before cutting out what the top was gonna do. I thought it was gonna fall because it kept spinning and then it got slower and started tilting.

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  14. Hanna Fahl
    Mr. Scheuer
    Modern Fiction- Hour 6
    20 February 2017

    I want to focus on the ending of the movie. I'm beyond frustrated. How did I sit through that long confusing movie just for it to end just as confusing. I don't want to sit here and process all these theories. I just want to know what in the world happened. I know that he wanted to be with his children no matter where it would be. Although, that wouldn't make sense because he could've stayed with the projection of his wife and been with his kids. I personally think he made it back to reality. I don't care what that stupid pin did. If it dropped or not, my theory is it was reality.




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  15. Janae Wright
    Mr.Scheuer
    Modern Fiction 6th hour
    Feb. 21,2017


    I feel like in the end The top dropped and it showed that cobb was in reality. I say that because in the end he could see his children's face . Throughout the whole movie he couldn't see his children's face. Something else that made me think the top dropped because when he got off the plane he didn't know anyone which made me believe everything was a theory to begin with.
    The best theory about inception was that the whole thing was a theory.

    ReplyDelete
  16. Hunter Sadler
    Mr.Scheuer
    Modern Fiction 8
    21 February 2017

    My theory on the top is that it fell eventually. When Cobb spun it inside of a dream, it spun fast and never wavered. At the end, when Cobb spun it, the top was wobbling at the end which makes me think it fell eventually. After reading some theories, I feel the only theory that can contradict mine is the wedding ring theory. Cobb never had his wedding ring in the real world, and the end scene we never get to see his left hand clearly. If he doesn't have a ring, then I feel that would secure the deal that he was in reality at the end.

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  17. Theodore Lontkowski
    Mr. Scheuer
    Modern Fiction - Hour 8
    21 February 2017
    Inception's ending was very ambiguous, but I do think that Cobb is not dreaming and is in reality because his ring was not on him at the end of the movie. Also based on what happened in the movie I do not think that it would make logical sense to ruin it all with him being in a dream. The top also, if you listened carefully sounded like it fell. The theory that Cobb's father might have been a projection is very convincing because they gave no explanation to why he was there. This theory does though give a simple reason for why he was there because how difficult would it have been for him to arrange a pick-up at the airport. This theory also is quite strange because it does not give much backing for why is there except for the fact he is a projection by Cobb's subconscious.

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  18. Brunson Parish
    Mr.Scheuer
    Modern Fiction - Hour 6
    21 February 2017

    Part 1: My theory is that Cobb is in a dream still. In my theory Cobb never came out of limbo everything he is thinking is all being made up in his head. My theory is that Mal was correct and they actually weren't in the real world but in a deep dream state but Cobb is so sure of himself that he fails to realize it. Another theory could be that the movie could be taking place inMal's dream the whole time but I don't know about that one.

    Part 2: My theory and other theories have a lot of similarities because I can see there point of view. But some of them have different characters as the cause which is interesting.

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  19. Isaiah Owens
    Modern fiction
    8th hr
    Part 1

    I feel that Cobb is still dreaming and everything was just a projection and that he is stuck in limbo dreaming of a happily ever after.

    Part 2

    Other online theories feel that at the end when he was distracted by his children they feel he was dreaming because they were wearing different clothes. There theory was kind of odd to me!

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  20. Liann Bade
    Mr. Scheuer
    Modern Fiction hour 8
    22 February 2017

    I think that the top did fall but was restarted to make it seem like it was spinning nonstop and the top was restarted to make it seem like it was still spinning nonstop.

    The fact that Cobb returns to his home and to his children they returned to the real world but there is no proof that the top did fall.

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  21. Astashia Perkins
    Mr. Scheuer
    Modern fic.
    02/22/17
    In all honesty I don't think the top fell. I think that because Cobb was so used to being in his subconscious and being in limbo that he kind of created his own little happy place to cope with the fact that the way his job was set up, he would never really truly be able to be content with his children and family. Mal was a shadow that his subconscious conjured up out of guilt because he was the one that ultimately caused her death. That should be the first clue that Cobb is not a reliable source nor point of view because his mind is so far gone that he can barely keep control of it. Also he probably went a little crazy having to always test dream vs. reality so he most likely just got tired and left it alone, it didn’t matter anymore as long as he felt that it was real.

    Evidence in the movie shows that in dream state Cobb would have on his wedding band and in reality he wouldn’t. Another thing was, before the screen turned black the top started to waddle maybe indicating reality? Saito was a very powerful and wealthy man so he could most likely bend the law for Cobb so he could go home. I somewhat agree with the theory that Cobb only had his ring on in dream state because if Mal was a shadow of guilt and she was his wife/love then why wouldn’t he have his wedding ring on around her? That’s something that makes sense because I don't think Saito would be honest about the situation and bend the law, also the top wobbling has nothing to do with reality vs. dreams in that situation. Even if it fell he had his back turned because he didn’t care. At the beginning he had a gun ready to blow his brains out if the top kept spinning but he got to the point where it just wasn’t important to him anymore.

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  22. Christian Lubke
    Mr. Scheuer
    Modern Fiction-8th Hour
    2/22/17

    In my opinion, at the end of the movie, Inception, I think Cobb was in reality. The reason I think this is because of the way the top was spinning at the end and the way Cobb saw his kids. If you look closely at the top at the end it started to lob side to side very quickly though. Also, Cobb got to see his kids faces, whereas in his dreams he could not see their face because they were turned the other way. I like the how the ending was ambiguous and left the audience wondering the ending.

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  23. Tim Schultz
    Mr. Scheuer
    Modern Fiction - Hour 8
    22 February 2017

    My theory for the end of the movie is that Cobb is in reality and no longer dreaming. After saving Saito from limbo, Cobb awakes on the plane. In order for this to have happened, they must've shot themselves in limbo after convincing Saito that it was a false reality. Dying in limbo would wake you up no matter how deep the dream is like what happened to Mal and Cobb in their limbo reality. Moving toward to the end of the movie, Cobb enters his home and spins his top on the table. At this scene, the viewers know it has to be reality because right as the credits are about to roll it starts to teeter unlike in the dream where it spun without sign of stopping.

    The screenrant theory is also a brilliant idea of what could be the ending. I really like the idea of Cobb's paranoia and how in the end he doesn't care about anything other than his children. I also like the idea of the Inception in our own minds for the ending of the movie. Nolan played the ending so well for his viewers.

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  24. Ebony Perry
    Mr. Scheuer
    Modern Fiction 8th hour
    21 February 2017
    This movie and article is kind of surprising and weird. My theory is that the top fell. I think it fell because when he spinned it at the end it started to wobble like it was going to fall. But I also think it was still a dream because his kids looked the same age and still had the same clothes on from throughout the movie. The article really shows how things in the movie didn't really add up to Cobb being in reality. Also it talks about when Cobb used Mal’s totem. They explained in the beginning that they can’t use anyone else’s totem and they shouldn’t touch it but Cobb did. He broke many of the “rules” of the dreams.

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  25. Tori Knueppel
    Mr. Scheuer
    Modern Fiction - Hour 8
    22 February 2017

    My first thoughts about the ending of the film were that Cobb and the team went back to reality and he finally got to see his kids again like he was promised. I assumed that the spinning top must have fallen over because it was wobbling a little bit, which it hadn’t done in the dreams. After reading the other theories, though, my thoughts changed a little bit (but I personally think that the inception on Cobb theory is a reach). I see that there is no real answer to what actually happened; the main point of the ending is that Cobb walked away from the top and went to his kids. The ending was supposed to show how Cobb was changed by everything that happened. He turned his back to the guilty dream world and faced what truly made him happy; I liked that explanation the best. It makes the unknown answer a little easier to accept.

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  26. Jawari Copeland
    Mr. Scheuer
    Modern Fiction 8th
    23 February 2017


    I don't think the top fell over, because I think they are still in a dream. I don't think that Mal would go down that easy, even thought she was within Cobb's subconscious. I think that she will later over take Cobb's subconscious and get revenge. In the other theories they explain the movie to be a heist on Cobb's subconscious. Not the possibility that it could all be a dream.



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  27. Nick Monsoor
    Mr. Scheuer
    Modern Fiction - 8th Hour
    February 23 2017

    I personally feel like the spinning top fell. At the end you see the top wobble a little but and during the dreams it never wobbled even a little. The fact that Cobb is using Mal's totem brings up that he could be in the dream and Mal could be messing with the totem. Also, we never heard Cobb talking to his father on the phone with an agreement to meet up at the airport. Both of those two points make it seem like he could still be dreaming. Especially seeing that his kids are also in the same exact positions, and look the same when he arrived home as they did in the dream.

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  28. Ben Forke
    Mr. Scheuer
    Modern Fiction - Hour 8
    February 23rd 2017
    My theory for the ending of inception is that it was all real. That Cobb’s reality was the true reality, and he really did inception and really did make it back to his kids. My reasoning is that Cobb is so completely obsessed with keeping track of what s real from is fake. It is his life, and it this comes from his wife confusing dream for reality and dieing for that idea. The idea that killed his wife came from Cobb, so he takes very seriously what is dream and what isn’t because he feels responsible for his wife's death. Also at the end of the movie the top does begin to wobble a little bit which never happened in a dream before.
    The theory where the inception was actually performed on Cobb is really good one because it is completely plausible and is backed up by much of the film. It is the furthest from my theory when comparing the two. I believe that everything he did was real and he lived in reality this person believes that everything he's done is completely in his head and people are putting ideas into his mind. I believe the inception on Cobb is a better theory though, because it is a lot more thoughtful and was kinda hinted at in very subtle ways from a lot of different shots and scenes. Not one theory is better than the other according to the theme of the film. It’s whatever I believe to be my reality is the reality.

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  29. Daniel Christian

    Mr Scheuer

    Modern Fiction- 8th Hour

    22 February 2017




    From what I have read online about the ending of Inception, it doesn't really seem to matter whether the top falls or not. I read an article of an explanation that the author gave at a graduation speech saying that the ending is whatever we want it to be and if we believe he is in reality at the end when he approached his kids, then that is the truth. I also believe he was in reality at the end of the movie because the top didn't stop spinning before they cut the screen to black, so there is not proof that it toppled, therefore he must be in reality. I think my theory is different from others, but I got my information from the author himself.

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  30. Collins,Kayla
    Mr.Scheuer
    Modern fiction
    February 20,2017

    Part One: Come up with your Own theory on the top, and thereby Cobb’s, Ultimate fate based on the elements of plot and point of view we covered in class.


    My theory on Cobb’s is that Cobb has a huge part in this film and gives off different aspects that are sometimes confusing but Cobb’s towards the end has me thinking about many different thing and one in specific is if Cobb is dreaming. I personally believe that it's a chance that Cobb is still dreaming, only because in the movie it kept showing Cobb’s kids as he remembered. Which was them in the same clothes and in the same spot in the back of their house playing outside. When Cobb’s came home to his kids they were in the same spot and had the same clothes on and were also the same age so maybe the movie makers weren't expecting us to catch the specific aspect or they meant to show it and to give us a clue that Cobb’s is still dreaming. My theory on the top is that Cobb’s spends a great amount of time in the movie showing him singing the top and it is know that the top is to help him focus on reality but at the end of the movie Cobb spins the top and walks away from it. My question is did the top ever stop? Does he leave the top because he believes he’s in reality Even tho he is ? Is Cobb’s going off of his own fate? Is the top and reality all in his head or is all of this true?


    Part Two: Compare and Contrast your theory with other online theory and post your findings, deciding which one is the best answer



    One article says that the entire movie is a whole dream and bases their theory from facts of the movie and I believe that they have a legit reason to believe that. However , my theory was a little similar even tho mines stated that it might be a dream , i didn't think the whole movie was a dream in itself but then again that might be true.The movie is difficult in itself and i feel like to get a complete understanding of the movie you might have to watch it a couple of times to catch all the aspects and details of the movie. I believe that the article I read has to be the best answers, because it describes different things that was shown from cobb’s through the movie like how mal’s death was driving him crazy and maybe because of that he has a mental illness and doesn't actually know which place is real or not and it all can be a dream or he could've just simply suffered from what mal suffered from if it wasn't quite a dream.

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  31. malcolm liston
    mr scheuer
    modern fiction 8th
    i dont really think the top fell over because at the end you can see the spinning top wobble some in reality but during the dreams the top never wobbled at all and had a steady pace

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  32. murajah jackson
    mr. scheur
    modern fiction 6th
    3/2/2017
    I believe that the ending of inception doesn't really matter because the point is he is with his kids. Even if it was a dream maybe that moment would have been the best reality for Cobb. Throughout the movie he went through a lot just to see there faces and was obsessed with rather he was in in reality or a dream nut in the end none of that mattered because he was with his kids. i think the best theory for me would be that Cobb was in fact in a dream but it no longer mattered because he was able to be with his kids and walk away from the top.

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  33. Syanne Garrett
    Mr. SCheuer
    Modern Fiction 8th Hour
    17 April 2017
    My theory is that the top fell. it was back to reality when he seen his children's faces, the dream was over. i think it was a dream inside a dream , he only seen the backs of his children while the top was spinning, but they didn't show the children when the top was spinning because he was back to real life. if the film were to continue after the top fell then his wife would no longer haunt him.

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  34. Mya Harris
    Mr. Scheuer
    Modern Fiction 6th hour
    1 May 2017

    I think that the top did fall. I say that because it wiggled and tilt at the end of the scene . They all woke up from all of the dreams, Cobb overcame his issues with Maul and he even got to see his kids faces. In all of dreams he was never allowed to see their faces. I think they woke up and everything was ok.

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  35. Aliyah Salinas

    Mr.scheuer

    Modern Fiction

    8TH HOUR


    I believe the top did fall. Only because at the end it started to wiggle and spin slower. Rather than when cobb spun it inside his dream it would spin very fast . The theory of the wedding is the only one that can really contradict it. Only because in the real world cobb never had his ring on and in the dream he did and towards the end of the movie you cant tell if he's wearing it or not.

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